As popular as lamb is in France, at least based on the concentration of lamb recipes in my French cookbooks, it is surprising to find that compared to other countries in the world, the French rank only tenth based on per capita consumption. (But this consumption is still ten times more than Americans consume.)
Lamb is available in a number of varieties and quality levels in France. Each region has its own claim to a unique, if subtle, flavor that makes its variety the best. Lamb may be sold as being from the Pyrenees, Pauillac, Auvergne, or another region. Lamb may be labeled as pré-salé indicating that it was raised near the sea on grass high in sodium and iodine.
In general, lamb is divided into three age-based categories. Agnelet (milk-fed lamb) is slaughtered before it is weaned at an age of 30 to 40 days when the animal weighs between 8 to 10 kilograms (18 to 22 pounds). The meat is very tender and delicate, but many people feel that it lacks flavor. Agneau blanc (white lamb), sometimes called laiton, is slaughtered at an age of about 70 to 150 days when it weighs 20 to 25 kilograms (44 to 55 pounds). Its diet is based on both milk and grass, yielding meat that is dark pink and firm when raw. The fat is white. The meat becomes very tender when cooked. About three-fourths of the lamb sold in France is of this type. Agneau gris (gray lamb), sometimes called broutart, is slaughtered when it is between 180 and 270 days old and weighs 30 to 40 kilograms (66 to 88 pounds). This lamb is mostly grass-fed with some additional cereal grains. The fat is no longer white and thus the name. Its meat is firmer and more fully flavored, which some people prefer.
Much of the lamb production in France is done under strict conditions and rules. The packaged lamb bears the label rouge stamp certifying compliance with these restrictions, which vary from region to region. Less than half of the lamb consumed in France is produced in France.
In the restaurants I’ve worked in in France where lamb was regularly served, the lamb was received as dressed carcasses weighing 15 to 20 kilograms (33 to 44 pounds). The cooks would break down the carcass into the various parts—generally shoulder roasts that were boned and rolled, racks, and legs. The breast was boned out, cubed, and cooked to be used as a garnish in sauces. The saddle went to the chef’s table for the family dinner. The bones were used to produce fond d’agneau, the lamb stock used in the sauces.
For most of us, the lamb we purchase will already be cut into a roast, chop, rack, or leg. The way it has been cut will partially be a function of where we reside. The manner in which lamb carcasses are butchered varies from country to country and from region to region. A diagram of the way French butchers generally divide a lamb carcass is shown below.
During the past few years I have received numerous requests for additional lamb recipes on this site. Hopefully, the recipes included will satisfy these requests.
 HOME 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
boulettes d’agneau au cumin
1 T
olive oil
100 g (312 oz)
finely diced onion
600 g (113 lb)
freshly ground lamb shoulder
1 extra‑large
egg
2 T
yogurt
4 T
almond powder
2 T
lemon juice
12 T
cumin seeds
4 T
chopped cilantro leaves
12 T
fine salt
12 t
freshly ground black pepper
grapeseed oil
1. Heat the olive oil in a small frying pan over medium heat and cook the onions until they begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Transfer the cooked onions to a plate and set aside to cool.
2. Place the lamb in the bowl of a stand mixer. Combine the egg with the yogurt and add to the lamb. Add the cooled onions, almond powder, lemon juice, cumin seeds, cilantro, salt, and pepper to the bowl. Using a paddle, mix at low speed until the mixture is blended and starts to hold together.
3. Use a 4‑cm (112‑in) round scoop to spoon out the meat mixture. Use one hand to form the portions into balls. Set aside.
4. Preheat the oven to 210°C (410°F).
5. Place some grapeseed oil in a frying pan to the depth of about 3 mm and set the pan over medium‑high heat. Working in batches, brown each lamb ball quickly on two sides. Drain the browned meat well and arrange on a baking sheet.
6. Place the browned meat in the oven and cook until almost barely pink in the center, about 6 minutes. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and tent with foil. Set aside to rest for 5 minutes.
7. Drain the lamb balls on absorbent paper before serving.
Yield: 4 servings, about 32 balls.
Ref: Guide Cuisine, May 2003, page 32.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
carré d’agneau
1, about 600 g (113 lb)
lamb rack consisting of 8 ribs
fine salt and freshly ground black pepper
grapeseed oil, or other neutral oil
1. Preheat the oven to 220°C (430°F).
2. Season the lamb with salt and pepper. Set aside.
3. Heat the oil in a wide frying pan over high heat. Brown the lamb on all sides.
4. Transfer the lamb to a roasting pan or leave it in the frying pan and place it in the oven. Bake for about 20 minutes or until the interior temperature reaches 50°C (125°F).
5. Remove the lamb from the oven and set aside, covered, for 5 minutes or so to rest.
6. Slice the rack into individual chops for serving.
Note: Serve the lamb with a pan sauce. For example: Sweat shallots, deglaze with cognac, dilute with demi‑glace, reduce, season with salt, pepper, and thyme.
Yield: 2 servings.
Ref: as prepared in the kitchen of Hostellerie Saint‑Georges, Gruyères, Switzerland, May, 2004.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
carré d’agneau Soubise
300 g (34 lb)
onions, shredded
512 T
unsalted butter
1, about 600 g (113 lb)
lamb rack consisting of 8 ribs
fine salt and freshly ground black pepper
12 T
all‑purpose flour
125 ml (12 c)
whole milk
pin
cayenne pepper
4 T
glace
1. Blanch the onions in salted, boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain well and continue cooking the onions for an additional 5 minutes in a frying pan with 1 T butter over medium heat. Do not brown the onions. When done, transfer the onions to a small, shallow roast pan.
2. Preheat oven to 220°C (430°F).
3. Melt 2 T butter in a frying pan over high heat. Season the lamb with salt and pepper. Brown the lamb on all sides.
4. Transfer the lamb to the roasting pan with the onions and place it in the oven. Bake for about 20 minutes or until the interior temperature reaches 50°C (125°F).
5. While the lamb is cooking, prepare a béchamel sauce: melt ½ T butter in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir in the flour and mix well. Allow the flour to cook without browning for a couple of minutes. Slowly whisk in the milk. Continue whisking until thickened. Season with salt, pepper, and cayenne. Set aside.
6. Remove the lamb from the oven and set aside, covered, for 5 minutes or so to rest.
7. Place the onions in a small food processor and process a bit. While processing add the béchamel sauce, a tablespoon at a time, until the onions form a smooth, slightly liquid puree. All of the sauce may not be required. Transfer the onion sauce to a small saucepan, reheat, and blend in 2 T butter.
8. Heat the glace gently in a small frying pan.
9. Slice the rack into individual chops for serving. Arrange the chops on heated serving plates and spoon the glace around the chops. Serve the sauce on the side.
Yield: 2 servings.
Ref: Auguste Escoffier, Le Guide culinaire, 1921, page 344.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
côtes d’agneau à la crème de poivrons rouge
300 g (34 lb)
red bell pepper
2
lamb chops
fine salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 T
grapeseed oil
75 ml (5 T)
dry white wine
150 ml (13 c)
heavy cream
freshly ground white pepper
2 T
chopped mixed herbs, such as chives, chervil and parsley
1. Preheat the oven to 220°C (430°F).
2. Cut the pepper in half, lengthwise, and remove the stem, core, and seeds. Place the halves, cut side down, on a baking sheet and bake for 20 minutes, or until the skin is loose.
3. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and tent with foil for 20 minutes or so. Using a small knife, carefully remove the skin from the pepper halves. Trim one of the halves into a rectangle that comprises about two‑thirds of the half. Save the trimmings. Cut the rectangle into 3‑mm (18‑in) wide strips and set aside.
4. Place the pepper trimmings and the other pepper half into a small food processor and puree. Press the puree through a strainer to remove any residual bits of skin. Set the puree aside.
5. Season the lamb chops with salt and pepper. Heat the oil in a frying pan over high heat. Brown the chops on the first side. Turn the chops over and finish in the oven. The internal temperature should not exceed about 46°C (115°F) for medium rare. Remove the chops and keep warm.
6. Drain any fat from the frying pan and deglaze it over high heat with the white wine. When the wine is about half evaporated, add the pepper puree and bring it to a boil. Add the cream, bring to a boil, and reduce the heat. Reduce the sauce until thick. Season with salt and white pepper. Add the reserved pepper strips and reheat.
7. Place the reserved chops on individual heated serving plates. Spoon the sauce over the chops. Sprinkle the chops with the chopped herbs.
Yield: 2 servings.
Ref: Alain & Eventha Senderens, La cuisine réussie, 1981, page 270.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
crépinettes de mouton
650 g (138 lb)
ground lamb
leaves from 3 sprigs
flat‑leaf parsley, minced
4 cloves
garlic, finely diced
1 t
cinnamon
fine salt
cayenne pepper
1 sheet
caul fat
1 T
olive oil
1 large
onion, shredded
12 large
red bell pepper, shredded
1 fresh
bay leaf
2 sprigs
fresh thyme
1 large
tomato, cored, peeled, seeded, shredded
30 ml (2 T)
chicken stock
1. Combine the ground lamb with the parsley, garlic, cinnamon, salt, and cayenne. Divide the meat into 4 equal portions. Roll the portions into balls and then flatten them into 2 to 3‑cm (1‑in) thick patties. Divide the caul fat into 4 large pieces and tightly wrap each patty. Use scissors to trim any excess caul fat at the seal.
2. Heat the oil in a high‑sided frying pan over medium‑high heat. Brown the lamb patties on both sides. Lower the heat a bit and add the onion, red pepper, bay leaf, and thyme to the frying pan. Carefully lift each patty and slide some of the vegetables underneath. Cook the vegetables until they soften, about 15 minutes.
3. Add the tomato and stock to the frying pan. Bring the stock to a boil, reduce heat, cover the frying pan, and cook until the meat is tender, about 40 minutes. Check the pan to make sure the liquid has not all evaporated, and to stir the contents around a bit.
4. When the meat is cooked, remove the patties and set them aside in a warm oven. Strain the juices from the vegetables. Set the vegetables in the same warm oven. Return the juices to the frying pan, increase heat to high, and reduce the juices until thickened.
5. Divide the vegetables into 4 portions and place a mound of each in the center of individual heated serving dishes. Place a lamb patty on each mound and spoon some sauce over the top.
Yield: 4 servings.
Ref: Curnonsky, Traditional French Cooking, 1989, page 359.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
daube de gigot
100 g (312 oz)
lean, unsmoked bacon, cut crosswise into 3‑mm (18‑in) thick strips
marc de Provence, or other eau de vie
75 g (212 oz)
fresh pig skin
fine salt
freshly ground black pepper
grapeseed oil
500 g (118 lb)
lamb leg, or shoulder, cut into 3‑cm (114‑in) cubes
2 medium
carrots, peeled, cut into 5 cm (2‑in) long pieces with the thicker ones cut lengthwise in two
4 cloves
garlic, peeled
1
bouquet garni
1 large strip
orange (or lemon) peel without pith
red wine
coarse salt
4 small
sweet onions, peeled
1. Marinate the bacon strips in the marc for about an hour.
2. Place the pig skin in a saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil. Drain. Trim any remaining fat from the skin. Trim the skin into long rectangular bands. Sprinkle the inside of the skin with fine salt and pepper and roll it into cylinders. Tie with string. Set aside.
3. Heat the oil in a saucepan over high heat. Brown the meat, a few pieces at time.
4. When all the meat is browned, drain any fat remaining in the saucepan. Return the meat to the saucepan along with the pork skin rolls, carrots, garlic, bouquet garni, and citrus peel. Drain the bacon and add it to the saucepan. Finally, add sufficient red wine to the saucepan to just cover the meat and vegetables. Season with coarse salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, lower heat, cover, and simmer until the meat is tender, about 2 hours. About an hour before the meat is done, add the onions.
5. When the meat is tender, carefully strain the contents of the saucepan. Set the liquid aside to cool in a refrigerator overnight. Discard the citrus peel and bouquet garni. Refrigerate the meat and vegetables overnight.
6. On the following day, remove and discard any fat that has separated from the cooking liquid. Bring the liquid to a boil in a saucepan large enough to hold the meat along with the sauce. Reduce the sauce over high heat by about half or two thirds.
7. Add the meat and vegetables to the saucepan. Gently reheat them. Taste for salt and add more if necessary.
Yield: 2 servings.
Ref: Guy Martin, Toute la cuisine, 2003, page 532.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
épaule d’agneau à l’ail
2 T
unsalted butter
500 g (118 lb)
boneless lamb shoulder in a single piece
75 ml (5 T)
warm water
coarse, gray salt and freshly ground black pepper
8 cloves
garlic, peeled, trimmed, germ removed
1 medium
yellow onion, peeled, trimmed, quartered
1 medium
carrot, peeled, cut into 3‑mm (18‑in) thick slices
2 sprigs
fresh thyme
1. Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Choose a saucepan just barely large enough for the piece of meat. Brown the meat thoroughly on all sides. Add the water and bring to a boil. Season with salt and pepper. Add the garlic, onion, carrot, and thyme. Cover, reduce heat, and cook the lamb at a simmer until tender, about 2 to 3 hours. The lamb is done when a fork slides easily into it, but before the meat starts to fall apart.
2. When the lamb is done, remove it from the saucepan. Set aside and keep warm. Remove the thyme sprig stem from the saucepan and discard.
3. Thoroughly puree the vegetables with the liquid in the saucepan using a stick blender. Add more salt and pepper if required. Simmer the sauce for a few minutes to allow it to thicken more.
4. Slice the lamb and arrange it on individual serving plates. Spoon the sauce over the meat.
Yield: 2 servings.
Ref: Mapie de Toulouse‑Lautrec, La Cuisine de Mapie, 2004, page 477.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
gigot d’agneau aux haricots tarbais
200 g (scant 12 lb)
haricots cocos (dried white beans)
1 small
onion, peeled
1 small
carrot, trimmed
1 small
bouquet garni
2 heads, about 200 g (scant 12 lb)
garlic, separated into individual cloves
whole milk, as required
1, about 112 kg (313 lb)
boned and tied leg of lamb
coarse salt and coarsely ground black pepper
4 T
grapeseed oil
2 T
unsalted butter
250 ml (1 c)
lamb or chicken stock
fine salt and freshly ground black pepper
leaves from 5 sprigs
flat‑leaf parsley, minced
1. Rinse the beans in cold water and place them in a saucepan along with the onion, carrot, and bouquet garni. Cover generously with cold water and place over high heat. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer until the beans are tender, about 2 hours. When the beans are cooked, remove the onion, carrot, and bouquet garni and discard. Set the beans aside.
2. Place the unpeeled garlic into a saucepan and cover with cold water. Set the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. When the water comes to a boil, drain the garlic. Cover the garlic with cold water again and once again bring it to a boil. When boiling, drain the garlic again. Repeat the whole process one more time.
3. Peel the garlic cloves. Trim the stem ends from each cloves. Split the cloves in half lengthwise. Remove the germ if green or prominent. Place the peeled garlic back into the saucepan and repeat the boiling and draining process three more times.
4. When the garlic is cooked, drain it thoroughly and place it in a small food processor. Puree the garlic. If necessary, add a tablespoon or two of milk until the puree becomes very smooth. Set the puree aside.
5. Preheat the oven to 230°C (445°F).
6. Massage the surface of the lamb with coarse salt and coarsely ground black pepper.
7. Heat 2 T oil in a shallow roasting pan over high heat. Brown the lamb thoroughly on all sides. Set the lamb aside.
8. Discard the cooking oil from the roasting pan and replace it with 2 new tablespoons of oil and the butter. Place the browned lamb in the roasting pan and set the pan in the oven. Cook the lamb, turning the meat once half way through the cooking, until the internal temperature reaches 43°C (109°F), about 30 minutes.
9. Transfer the lamb to a plate, cover with foil and a couple of heavy towels, and set aside to rest for 15 minutes.
10. While the lamb is resting, discard the fat from the roasting pan. Place the pan over high heat and deglaze with the stock. When the stock is reduced by about two‑thirds, mix in the reserved garlic puree. Season with fine salt and freshly ground black pepper. Set aside and keep warm.
11. Reheat the beans. Season with fine salt and pepper. Add the minced parsley. Set aside and keep warm.
12. When the lamb is finished resting, drain the juices exuded from the roast into the garlic puree and combine. Slice the lamb. Arrange the lamb slices on individual, heated serving plates. Spoon the garlic puree over the lamb. Divide the beans between the serving plates.
Yield: 4 servings.
Ref: Bernard Loiseau, Cuisine en famille, 1997, page 163.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
gigot de mouton au wasabi cuit à la vapeur
500 g (118 lb)
lamb leg, or shoulder, butterflied into a 2‑cm (34‑in) thick rectangular shape
about 1 T
prepared wasabi paste
fine salt and freshly ground black pepper
1. Lay the meat flat on a work surface. Evenly coat one surface with a thin coating of wasabi paste. Roll the meat into a cylindrical shape and tie firmly with string. Wrap the meat tightly in plastic wrap and set aside in a refrigerator for about 8 hours.
2. Preheat a steamer.
3. Remove the meat from it wrapping, dry with absorbent paper, season with salt and pepper, and wrap tightly again in fresh plastic wrap. Steam the meat until the internal temperature reaches 40 to 45°C (105 to 115°F), about 30 minutes.
4. Remove the meat from the steamer and set aside, tented, for 10 minutes to rest.
5. To serve, remove the wrapping and strings and cut crosswise into slices.
Yield: 2 to 4 servings.
Ref: Guy Martin, Toute la cuisine, 2003, page 547.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
navarin d’agneau, légumes primeurs
2 T
grapeseed oil
500 g (118 lb)
lamb shoulder, cut into 3 to 4‑cm (112‑in) cubes
coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
125 ml (12 c)
water
1 small
carrot, finely diced
1 small
onion, finely diced
1 clove
garlic, peeled, germ removed
1
bouquet garni
12 T
tomato paste
1 medium
carrots, cut into 5‑cm (2‑in) long by 5‑mm (14‑in) square sticks
1 medium
turnip, cut into 5‑cm (2‑in) long by 5‑mm (14‑in) square sticks
75 g (212 oz)
peas, shucked
75 g (212 oz)
French beans, trimmed
1 medium
zucchini, cut into 5‑cm (2‑in) long by 5‑mm (14‑in) square sticks
1. Heat the oil in a saucepan over high heat. Brown the lamb in small batches. As each batch is done, drain and set aside. When all the lamb is browned, discard the cooking fat.
2. Return all the lamb to the saucepan. Season the meat with salt and pepper. Add the water, minced carrot, minced onion, garlic, bouquet garni, and tomato paste. Bring to a boil, skim the scum from the surface, reduce heat, cover, and simmer until the meat is tender, about 45 minutes.
3. While the meat is cooking, blanch the julienned carrots, turnips, peas, beans, and zucchini until tender in separate batches of salted, boiling water. As each is cooked, drain well, shock in ice water, and drain again. If desired, peel the peas.
4. When the meat is tender, remove it from the saucepan and set aside. Reduce the cooking liquid by about three‑fourths. Strain the liquid through a very fine strainer. Place the cooking liquid back into the saucepan along with the meat and vegetables. Season with salt and pepper and gently reheat.
Yield: 2 servings.
Ref: Guy Savoy, Vos Petits Plats par un grand, 2003, page 134.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
sauté d’agneau au curry et raisins secs
35 g (scant 14 c)
golden raisins
olive oil
500 g (118 lb)
lamb shoulder, cut into large pieces for stewing
1 medium
onion, peeled, thinly sliced
2 cloves
garlic, peeled, thinly sliced
12 branch
celery, thinly sliced
250 g (12 lb)
plum tomatoes, cored, peeled, seeded, diced
2 small, whole
sweet red peppers
12 T
curry powder
coarse salt
18 t
cayenne pepper [optional]
75 ml (5 T)
water
juice from 12
lime
1 T
chervil, coarsely chopped
1. Place the raisins in a small saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the water until it becomes a syrup. Drain the raisins and rinse with running water.
2. Heat some oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Brown the lamb in a single layer in the oil. As pieces of meat brown on one side, turn them over to brown the other side. Remove from the saucepan when browned and set aside. Add the onions, garlic, and celery to the saucepan and cook until the onions start to soften.
3. Add the browned lamb, raisins, tomato, red peppers, curry powder, salt, cayenne pepper [optional], and water to the saucepan. Bring to a boil, lower heat, cover, and simmer until the lamb is tender, about 2 hours.
4. Just before serving, mix in the lime juice. Divide the stew between heated serving plates and sprinkle with chervil.
Yield: 2 servings.
Ref: Cuisine et Vins de France, April‑May 2003, page 42.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
souris d’agneau braisée à l’ail confit
2, about 500 g (1 lb) each
lamb shanks
quatre épices, fine salt, and freshly ground black pepper
125 ml (12 c)
port wine
500 ml (2 c)
chicken stock
10 large cloves
garlic, unpeeled
olive oil
1. Preheat oven to 230°C (445°F).
2. Rub the quatre épices, salt, and pepper thoroughly into the lamb shanks.
3. Using a large, heavy‑bottomed roasting pan with a tight‑fitting cover, stand the lamb shanks with the fat end down in a dry pan. Roast the lamb, uncovered, for 1 hour.
4. Remove the roasting pan from the oven and place it over high heat on top of the stove. Transfer the lamb shanks to a plate. Deglaze the pan with the wine. Scrape up any cooked bits stuck to the bottom of the pan. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Return the lamb shanks to the pan, standing as before. Cover the pan and return it to the oven. Roast for an additional 112 hours.
5. While the lamb is roasting, place the garlic cloves in a small saucepan. Cover with olive oil. Place the saucepan over medium‑low heat. When bubbles start to form, lower the heat. Maintain the heat so there are always a few small bubbles. Cook the garlic until tender when tested with a small knife. When done remove from the heat and set aside.
6. When the lamb is cooked, remove the roasting pan from the oven. Transfer the lamb shanks to a heated plate, cover, and let them rest for 10 minutes. Pour off the fat. If the remaining sauce is too thick, place the pan over high heat and deglaze the pan with chicken stock. When everything is dissolved, strain the sauce into a bowl. Remove any grease that forms on the top.
7. Serve the lamb shanks on heated serving plates along with the garlic cloves, well drained. Serve the sauce in a separate bowl.
Yield: 2 servings.
Ref: Patricia Wells, The Paris Cookbook, 2001, page 221.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
tranches de gigot à l’ail
1 T
olive oil
1 T
all‑purpose flour
200 ml (1312 T)
warm water
1
fresh bay leaf
25 g (1 oz)
minced garlic
450 g (1 lb)
plum tomatoes, cored, peeled, seeded, diced
fine salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 thick slices, about 200 g (12 lb) each
lamb leg
1. Heat the oil and flour in a saucepan over medium heat. Mix well and cook until lightly browned. Mix in the water. Stir until smooth. Add the bay leaf and garlic. Bring to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes.
2. Add the diced tomato to the sauce and reduce until thick, about 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
3. Preheat the oven to 220°C (425°F).
4. Brown the lamb slices in a dry, nonstick frying pan over high heat. Finish the cooking in the oven. Remove the pan when the meat is about 43°C (110°F) in the center. Set the meat aside, covered, to rest for 8 to 10 minutes before serving.
5. Place the lamb slices on individual heated serving plates. Spoon the sauce over the lamb.
Yield: 2 servings.
Ref: Guy Martin, Toute la cuisine, 2003, page 543.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.
un simple gigot de rôti
4 large
onions, shredded
1 head
garlic, peeled germ removed, thinly sliced
10 sprigs
fresh thyme
2 kg (412 lb)
bone‑in lamb leg, hip bone removed
coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
100 g (312 oz)
demi‑glace
fine salt
1. Preheat oven to 220°C (430°F).
2. Strew the onions, garlic, and thyme over the bottom of a roasting pan that is just large enough for the lamb leg. Rub the lamb with coarse salt and pepper and place on top of the vegetables.
3. Roast the lamb until the internal temperature reaches 40°C (105°F), about 45 minutes. Remove the roasting pan from the oven and tent with foil. Cover the foil with a couple layers of kitchen towels. Set aside to rest for 30 minutes. Alternatively, set the pan aside to rest in an oven at 65°C (150°F).
4. When the meat has rested, transfer the leg to a carving board. Discard the thyme sprigs. Transfer the onions, garlic, and any juices in the roasting pan to a wide frying pan over medium‑high heat. Add the demi‑glace and stir occasionally until the sauce is thickened.
5. In the meantime, carve the leg by slicing the two, large protruding muscles on the diagonal toward the hip.
6. Divide the lamb between heated serving plates. Mound the vegetables along with its sauce next to the lamb. Serve immediately.
Yield: 8 servings.
Ref: Frédéric Médigue, Le Château d’Amondans, France, May 17, 2004.
 CLOSE 
©2005, 2014 Peter Hertzmann. All rights reserved.